EMS World Magazine/EMSWorld.com Author Guidelines

EMS World Magazine/EMSWorld.com Author Guidelines

Article Jul 09, 2014

Articles are accepted for publication on condition that they are contributed solely to EMS World Magazine and/or EMSWorld.com. Authors should secure all necessary clearances and approvals prior to submission. Receipt of all manuscripts will be acknowledged immediately, and every effort will be made to notify contributors of the status of their submission within 60 days. Manuscripts should be from 1,500 to 3,000 words; however, the most important element is content, not length.

Photographs and illustrations (including a photograph of each author) add greatly to the value of the articles. We encourage authors to include them. If a final piece of artwork is not available, please include a rough sketch of what is needed; our art director will then contact you. Digital photographs must be submitted as either tif or jpeg files, saved at 300 dpi if possible. Number references in order of their appearance in the text. For journal articles, include author, title, journal, volume, page numbers and year. For books, include author, chapter title, book title, editor, page numbers, place of publication and date.

E-mail manuscripts to editor@emsworld.com. Each author’s full name and affiliation must be noted on the first page in precisely the form the author desires the information to be published. One author should be designated as correspondent, with contact address, telephone number and e-mail.

We reserve the right to edit all papers for clarity or length, as well as punctuation, spelling, grammar, syntax and other word usage.

These guidelines are provided for the convenience of the author; however, individuals desiring to contribute papers should not hesitate to make inquiries even if they are unfamiliar with procedures for writing and submitting manuscripts. The editorial staff will be pleased to assist in any way. Our goal is to provide relevant, high-quality information; to write and publish with absolute integrity; and to serve as effectively as possible the needs of the individuals involved in emergency medical services. If you have information, articles or manuscripts that would help us to achieve these goals, we would like to hear from you. E-mail editor@emsworld.com, or call 800/547-7377, ext. 1110.

The NAEMSP issued a statement in response to the recent mass shooting in Las Vegas.
The uSmartĀ® 3200T NexGen enables emergency responders to perform ultrasounds outside the hospital environment.
Country artists performed for gunshot wound victims like firefighter Kurt Fowler, and expressed their gratitude to first responders and hospital staff who helped others the night of the attack.
In an era where many rely on cell phones instead of landlines connected to emergency alert systems, many residents didn't receive warnings of the fires.
Jennifer Lopez, Stevie Wonder, and Ellen DeGeneres are among the group of celebrities who have raised a combined $30 million to assist with recovery efforts in Puerto Rico.
Krista McDonald died on scene and EMT Peggy Eastman was critically injured after a vehicle broadsided their ambulance.

As unpredictable mass casualty incidents have been increasingly on the rise, the Stop the Bleed campaign aims to teach citizens how to stop severe blood loss to keep victims alive before first responders can arrive on scene.

Duracell's disaster relief program has provided batteries to hurricane-ravaged Puerto Rico, Texas, Florida, and Louisiana so people can operate their phones, flashlights, radios and other necessary devices.
The Miami Marlins have donated $200,000 to the hurricane and earthquake relief efforts for the devastated areas of Puerto Rico, Florida, Mexico and the Caribbean.
UC Berkeley's Seismology Lab team developed the app to alert users of impending earthquakes so they have more time to prepare for safety.
In addition to sending representatives from a dozen agencies to tend to California, FEMA has sent meals, water, blankets and cots to shelters and provided emergency funds to fire departments and residents.
The app will help teachers and administrators easily communicate during crises and are also being trained by law enforcement on how to act in an active shooter event.
The air quality index is five times what's considered the safe amount, causing symptoms like having trouble breathing, stinging eyes, running noses and scratching throats.
There are other, maybe better ways to reach EMS learners.
The H*VENT vented chest dressing treats not only the presence of air in the chest (pneumothorax) but also allows fluids such as blood to be released from the chest (hemothorax).