ZOLL Medical Corporation Named to Globe 100 Again

ZOLL Medical Corporation Named to Globe 100 Again

News Jun 06, 2011

June 1, 2011 -- CHELMSFORD, MASS. -- ZOLL Medical Corporation (Nasdaq GS: ZOLL), a manufacturer of resuscitation devices and related software solutions, today announced that The Boston Globe has named the Company to the Globe 100 list of top performing public companies in Massachusetts.

Based on a composite score derived from financial data for the four quarters ending December 31, 2010, ZOLL was ranked 39 among Massachusetts-based companies whose stock is publicly traded, moving up from number 67 a year earlier. It is one of eight medical device companies to have been included in the Globe 100, which is now in its 23rd year. This year, only 90 Massachusetts companies were named to the Globe 100 list, serving as a lingering reminder of the challenging economic climate.

"The Massachusetts economy is recovering and the companies on the Globe 100 are leading the way," said Shirley Leung, Boston Globe Business Editor. To qualify for this year's Globe 100, a company must have been public for the entire 2010 calendar year and have reported a positive net income for both 2009 and 2010. Companies are ranked on four criteria: return on average equity, one-year percentage change in revenue, one-year percentage change in profit margin, and 2010 revenue.

"We are extremely pleased to be named again this year and rank as number 39 in the company of Massachusetts' strongest business organizations from various sectors," said Richard A. Packer, Chief Executive Officer of ZOLL. "We are also delighted that based on our performance we continue to rise in the rankings despite some of the challenges in health care spending over the last year."

About ZOLL Medical Corporation

ZOLL Medical Corporation develops and markets medical devices and software solutions that help advance emergency care and save lives, while increasing clinical and operational efficiencies. With products for defibrillation and monitoring, circulation and CPR feedback, data management, fluid resuscitation, and therapeutic temperature management, ZOLL provides a comprehensive set of technologies that help clinicians, EMS and fire professionals, and lay rescuers treat victims needing resuscitation and critical care.

A NASDAQ Global Select company and a Forbes 100 Most Trustworthy Company in 2007, 2008, and 2009, ZOLL develops and manufactures its products in the United States, in California, Colorado, Illinois, Massachusetts, Pennsylvania, and Rhode Island. More than 400 direct sales and service representatives, 1,100 business partners, and 200 independent representatives serve our customers in over 140 countries around the globe.

For more information, visit www.zoll.com.

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