IAFC Issues Position on Drug Shortage

IAFC Issues Position on Drug Shortage

News Mar 13, 2012

The IAFC has issued a position on the nationwide drug shortage.

The statement comes about a week after a new focus group announced the drug shortage was one of its major areas of concern.

“A solution must be found; paramedics must have the crucial and necessary drugs to save the lives of their patients,” said Chief Gary Ludwig, chair of the IAFC EMS Section. “The ability to administer the appropriate pharmaceutical products to patients in the field can be the difference between life and death. We all know that rapid intervention is essential in these situations; waiting to administer life-saving drugs until the victim reaches an emergency room—at least 10 to 15 minutes after we have begun care—creates a serious and unnecessary risk.”

The IAFC was included in the new group, and had representatives in attendance at the inaugural meeting in Baltimore.

The National Joint EMS Leadership Forum – comprised of representatives of several organizations – narrowed their focus to two issues – the nationwide drug shortage and NEMSIS.

The group discussed a number of matters during its inaugural meeting last week in Baltimore.

“We came up with a dozen things that need attention. But, we agreed to look at those two first,” said Dia Gainor, executive director of National Association of State EMS Officials.

NEMSIS is a database established to collect, store and share EMS information. It is a project of NHTSA.

The nationwide drug shortage and expiration of medications also has providers concerned. Two working groups will delve into these issues.

“The national drug shortage is having a major impact on fire-based EMS, but it is also a larger public safety issue,” said IAFC President Al Gillespie. “Even if your department does not provide EMS, the repercussions of shortages in your community can negatively impact your ability to successfully save lives and the ability of others to help responders in need of emergency care. I encourage every fire service leader to educate themselves on this issue and become a part of the solution.”

Continue Reading

The IAFC statment can be viewed here.

 

EMSWorld.com News
Avaya plans to honor the Texas Commission as it sees the adoption of Kari’s Law build across the country, a law which would mandate any company or organization with multi-line telephone systems to provide direct-dial access to 9-1-1.
The company achieves a milestone of its first U.S. regulatory filing for a medical device which would aid in hemostasis and wound care.
Senators will have to vote on multiple amendments on the health care repeal bill.
County commissioners decided to write off over $5 million in uncollectible ambulance bills owed by residents, an amount that has been building since the 1940s.
The amount of deaths caused by substance abuse and mental health issues in the first half of 2017 have surpassed the total deaths of 2016.

The raging wildfires have forced 10,000 residents to evacuate their homes. 

For the first time in my EMS career, I froze.
The two agencies compete for ticket votes from blood donors to raise awareness for the increased need for blood during the summer.
Los Angeles firefighters and law enforcement are "resource rich" in nuclear threat preparation, like specialized trucks with advanced sensors for radiation levels, says the emergency operations commander.

Lee County, Fla. EMS will soon have its own substation in North Fort Myers. Chiefs for the North Fort Myers Fire District and Lee County EMS said it was time for a change because of overcrowding. 

EMS professionals are all taught to look for a MedicAlert bracelet or a necklace. This simple step has become much more complex in the information age, and we may not realize for what and where to look.
The drill involving over 200 people put multiple first responder agencies to the test.
The training was based on lessons learned from the Columbine shooting and taught school employees safety and security measures.
One third of the state's record-high 376 overdose deaths that occurred last year were caused by prescribed painkillers.
The training will be focused on prescribing buprenorphine, the drug used to assist patients in quitting their opiate addiction and relieve withdrawal symptoms.