Idaho Woman Accused of Stealing From Hospital ER

Idaho Woman Accused of Stealing From Hospital ER

News Nov 06, 2012

Two Idaho Falls police officers reportedly were assaulted Sunday when a woman was found stealing medical supplies from an eastern Idaho emergency room.

Angelique Usuzette Swinney, 36, was caught stealing vials of drugs and other medical supplies from Eastern Idaho Regional Medical Center, police spokeswoman Joelyn Hansen said. Swinney was a patient at the time.

Police also said they found 73 hydrocodone pills on Swinney. She didn't have a prescription in her possession. Those pills did not come from EIRMC.

Swinney was arrested for petit theft, possession of a prescription drug without a prescription, disturbing the peace, obstructing and resisting an officer and felony assault on an officer.

When Officers Tom Schwicht and Leen VanHulten arrived at 2:21 a.m. at the hospital, Swinney was reportedly uncooperative and started to scream and kick the officers.

She also attempted to bite the officers but was unsuccessful, Hansen said. Because she was violent, and to prevent her from hurting herself and the officer, Swinney was shocked with a stun gun, Hansen said.

Hansen said Swinney was uninjured.

Swinney remained in custody Monday at the Bonneville County Jail on a $5,000 bond.

Her next court appearance is set for 8 a.m. Dec. 13.

Felony assault on a police officer is punishable by up to five years in prison.

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Idaho Falls Post Register (Idaho)
By Ruth Brown,
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