DOT Launches Free App Featuring Emergency Response Guidebook

DOT Launches Free App Featuring Emergency Response Guidebook

News Jan 20, 2013

WASHINGTON – The U.S. Department of Transportation’s Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA) today announced a free, mobile web app of its Emergency Response Guidebook 2012 (ERG).  The new safety tool will provide the nation’s emergency responders with fast, easily accessible information to help them manage hazardous material incidents.

The mobile ERG will make it easier for firefighters, police and other emergency first responders to quickly locate the information they need, thanks to an electronic word search function, and will ensure easy reading even during nighttime emergencies.   The 2012 version of the ERG includes new evacuation tables for large toxic gas spills and standard response procedures for gas and liquid pipeline incidents.

“The first 30 minutes are the most crucial when it comes to responding to a hazmat situation,” said U.S. Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood.   “The new app is both mobile and flexible, and gives first responders the knowledge they need to protect themselves and their communities in an emergency.”

PHMSA and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ National Library of Medicine (NLM) joined forces in producing the two free ERG mobile applications.

Links to download this software are available from the Apple iTunes website at ERG 2012 for iPhone and from the Google Play website at ERG 2012 for Android.  In addition, a version of the ERG is available in NLM’s Wireless Information System for Emergency Responders (WISER) application.  An instructional video for learning how to use the ERG2012 is also available on PHMSA’s website.

“This invaluable tool improves the speed and accessibility to hazardous materials response information to those on the front line of accidents and incidents,” said PHMSA Administrator Cynthia Quarterman.

Chief Ernest Mitchell, the Federal Emergency Management Agency's U.S. Fire Administrator for the U.S. Fire Administration. noted that the release of the 2012 ERG mobile app “will provide essential tools to help first responders safely deal with hazmat incidents. I always found the ERG to be extremely valuable and believe that a copy should be in every emergency response vehicle and in the hand of every first responder in America.”

The Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration develops and enforces regulations for the safe, reliable, and environmentally sound operation of the nation's 2.5 million mile pipeline transportation system and the nearly 1 million daily shipments of hazardous materials by land, sea, and air. Please visit http://phmsa.dot.gov for more information.

Source
DOT
Avaya plans to honor the Texas Commission as it sees the adoption of Kari’s Law build across the country, a law which would mandate any company or organization with multi-line telephone systems to provide direct-dial access to 9-1-1.
The company achieves a milestone of its first U.S. regulatory filing for a medical device which would aid in hemostasis and wound care.
Senators will have to vote on multiple amendments on the health care repeal bill.
County commissioners decided to write off over $5 million in uncollectible ambulance bills owed by residents, an amount that has been building since the 1940s.
The amount of deaths caused by substance abuse and mental health issues in the first half of 2017 have surpassed the total deaths of 2016.

The raging wildfires have forced 10,000 residents to evacuate their homes. 

For the first time in my EMS career, I froze.
The two agencies compete for ticket votes from blood donors to raise awareness for the increased need for blood during the summer.
Los Angeles firefighters and law enforcement are "resource rich" in nuclear threat preparation, like specialized trucks with advanced sensors for radiation levels, says the emergency operations commander.

Lee County, Fla. EMS will soon have its own substation in North Fort Myers. Chiefs for the North Fort Myers Fire District and Lee County EMS said it was time for a change because of overcrowding. 

EMS professionals are all taught to look for a MedicAlert bracelet or a necklace. This simple step has become much more complex in the information age, and we may not realize for what and where to look.
The drill involving over 200 people put multiple first responder agencies to the test.
The training was based on lessons learned from the Columbine shooting and taught school employees safety and security measures.
One third of the state's record-high 376 overdose deaths that occurred last year were caused by prescribed painkillers.
The training will be focused on prescribing buprenorphine, the drug used to assist patients in quitting their opiate addiction and relieve withdrawal symptoms.