Relatives of 49ers' Player Killed in Crash; Woman Charged with DWI

Relatives of 49ers' Player Killed in Crash; Woman Charged with DWI

News Feb 07, 2013

The aunt and uncle of San Francisco 49ers tight end Delanie Walker were killed in a car crash Monday shortly after 5:30 a.m. CT, hours after the 49ers lost to the Baltimore Ravens in Super Bowl XLVII in New Orleans, Louisiana State Police confirmed Wednesday.

Walker's agent, Vincent Taylor, said Alice, 42, and Bryan Young, 54, were staying in a hotel in Baton Rouge and were driving there after spending time with Walker and family members after the game. Taylor said the Youngs had pulled over on the side of the highway when their car was hit from behind.

Nechole Thomas, 26, of Houston was the driver that crashed into the Youngs' car. The police report states she was traveling at a high rate of speed on I-10 west in St. Charles Parish on the right shoulder when the accident occurred.

Both cars caught fire and, after the flames were extinguished, the Youngs were discovered in their vehicle and pronounced dead.

Thomas was arrested and charged with two counts of vehicular homicide, DWI and reckless operation. Authorities say preliminary toxicology results indicate Thomas tested over the legal blood-alcohol limit of 0.08%. Drug tests are pending.

In December 2011, Thomas was charged with a felony in St. Louis for allegedly using the heel of her stiletto to damage another person's car, including causing numerous dents and breaking a TV monitor and DVD player inside the vehicle. Her trial in that case is scheduled for April 15.

In pictures Walker posted on Instagram, the Youngs are seen enjoying Super Bowl festivities wearing Mardi Gras-style beads and are also seen with Walker at the 49ers practice Saturday.

"Im going to miss y'all but i know they are in a better place." Walker wrote on his Twitter page.

Contributing: Rachel George

Copyright 2013 Gannett Company, Inc.All Rights Reserved

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Mike Garafolo, @mikegarafolo, USA TODAY Sports
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