Dallas Rolls Out Public Access Trauma Kits

Dallas Rolls Out Public Access Trauma Kits

News Sep 07, 2016

Dr. Alex Eastman, medical director and chief surgeon at Parkland's Rees-Jones Trauma Center, was at City Hall to roll out a new trauma kit containing gloves, gauze and tourniquets, intended to help civilians treat gunshot wounds and other serious injuries until the professionals arrive.

The police department is already using the kits.

Eastman, a longtime member of the Dallas Police Department's SWAT response team who was downtown on July 7, said there was no doubt about it: Incidents involving active shooters are taking place at an "an alarmingly increased rate." And in Dallas, he said, this has become "painfully obvious."

But he also made it very clear: The trauma kits introduced Tuesday were not a response to the ambush that killed five officers and wounded nine others.

Rather, Eastman said, this was part of a citywide effort to make Dallas "the most safe municipality to live in." The kits, he said, are being rolled out citywide as part of President Barack Obama's policy directive concerning national preparedness, which tasks civilians with tending to the injured until rescue workers arrive.

"Hemorrhage control," Eastman said, "is the CPR of the 21st century."

He demo'd the kit on two actors depicting gunshot wound victims — a man with leg and arm injuries, and a woman with a gaping chest wound.

"If my mom can do it," he said, after wrapping their wounds, "anybody can do it."

On Twitter:  @RobertWilonsky

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Dallas Morning News
Robert Wilonsky
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