All India Institute of Medical Sciences Creates Application That Helps Monitor Hearts

All India Institute of Medical Sciences Creates Application That Helps Monitor Hearts

News Apr 04, 2017

April 03--The cardiology department of the All India Institute of Medical Sciences (Aiims) has developed a mobile phone application called 'Dhadkan' that aims to help doctors monitor the condition of their heart patients remotely.

An article about the technology was published under the section for innovations in the current issue of Journal of the Practice of Cardiovascular Sciences.

"Almost one third of patients after admission for heart failure are likely to get readmitted or die in the next 3 -- 6 months," according to the article. The app can help the authorised caregiver -- a doctor, nurse or a paramedic -- in monitoring vital statistics every week and predicting any adverse event.

The app collects data on blood pressure, heart rate and weight and transmits it as an SMS to the registered caregiver.

"Anyone can use this app. The doctor or nurse, whoever will be monitoring the data, will have to register first and then the patient will have to register. The data will be sent to the registered caregiver for the patient," said Dr Sandeep Seth, professor in the department of cardiology at Aiims and the man behind the app.

A local nurse or physician records the parameters and feeds them into the app, and an Aiims doctor can then remotely view the patient's condition. The technology was developed to help patients from far-flung areas who cannot come to Delhi for a check-up at regular intervals.

After the app was launched, a validation study was conducted for 60 Aiims patients, whose data was being monitored by an assigned nurse.

"The nurse and the doctor intervene whenever there are inappropriate blood pressure fluctuations or heart rate fluctuations in the patient or an increase in weight over the week," the article read. Interventions using the 'Dhadkan' app showed improvements in the quality of life, the article added.

___ (c)2017 the Hindustan Times (New Delhi) Visit the Hindustan Times (New Delhi) at www.hindustantimes.com Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

Source
McClatchy
Anonna Dutt Hindustan Times, New Delhi
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