Ga. Residents Learn CPR from AHA Demo Exhibit

Ga. Residents Learn CPR from AHA Demo Exhibit

News Jul 05, 2017

July 05—Everyone should know how to save a life.

The American Heart Association, in partnership with Gold Cross Emergency Medical Services, recently demonstrated the value of CPR by setting up mannequins downtown across from the James Brown statue to mark CPR and AED awareness.

Capt. Connie Waldhour of the Gold Cross Emergency Medical Services demonstrated to passers-by how to correctly perform hands-only CPR.

One-by-one Waldhour instructed participants to place their hands directly in between the center of the mannequin's chest and push 2 inches deep into it.

After a few failed attempts Delores Wilson—an Augusta resident who said she was drawn to the table by the flailing of Heart Man, the American Heart Association's mascot—finally grasped making complete chest compressions.

"I was attracted by the heart-shaped (mascot), and my friend and I came down to take a picture of it and then I noticed that they were doing a demo," she said. "I have a husband who has a heart condition, so it interested me very well, and finally I got it."

Her friend Cynthia Millsaps, who has a heart condition, assisted Wilson with her compressions along the way. Millsaps said she feels equipped not only to teach someone about hands-only CPR but also to potentially save a life.

"I have a heart condition so it makes me feel good that I actually learned how to do it," she said. "I saw it on TV where they were learning how to do it, and he actually asked at the end, 'I can save you, can you save me?' so actually now I can say that I can save somebody else because I actually did it myself."

Catherine Ramsey, the senior communications and marketing director for the American Heart Association, said the mission is to spread the message that it only takes only a minute to save someone's life.

According to Ramsey, about 90 percent of people who suffer out-of-hospital cardiac arrest die. A report from the American Heart Association states that CPR, especially if performed immediately, can double or triple a cardiac arrest victim's chance of survival.

Continue Reading

"It's just two simple steps—call 9-1-1 and push," Ramsay said.

Clark Rabun, who served in the Marines, said little has changed since the time he learned CPR, but to see it still being taught is reassuring.

"It used to be mouth and chest pumps and now it's just mostly chest pumps, and they say you don't stop until you get an emergency vehicle or somebody to help you, so that is the two changes right there," he said.

"But I actually feel good that I can do that on someone. I hadn't done it in a few years, and I just think that it is a very good thing for folks to learn how to do in case they need to do it."

The Augusta Chronicle, Ga.

Source
McClatchy
One of the paramedics was treated after getting hit with shards of glass after the bullet went through the windshield, but the ambulance is not believed to have been intentionally targeted.
The drones are used to improve scene management by assessing areas that are difficult or dangerous for personnel to reach.
Dozens of firefighters and police officers join the annual week-long Brotherhood Ride to honor 20 first responders who have died in the line of duty in Florida.
The event will be held on August 20, with all proceeds going to Narberth Ambulance, an agency that provides emergency services to 145,000 residents.
Speakers presented on topics such as disaster relief, emerging pathogens, the opioid crisis and cyber security.
The state's Department of Health has established an agreement for UNC and NCBP to collaborate on providing public health data to NEMSIS to better prepare EMS for national emergencies.
State troopers rendered aid before turning them over to responding EMS units and New Castle County Paramedics.
Three people were fatally shot and at least 21 others were wounded in separate attacks from Saturday morning to early Sunday.
Crestline Coach attended the Eighth Annual Saskatchewan Health & Safety Leadership conference on June 8 to publicly sign the “Mission: Zero” charter on behalf of the organization, its employees and their families.
ImageTrend, Inc. announced the winners of the 2017 Hooley Awards, which recognize those who are serving in a new or innovative way to meet the needs of their organization, including developing programs or solutions to benefit providers, administrators, or the community.
Firefighters trained with the local hospital in a drill involving a chemical spill, practicing a decontamination process and setting up a mass casualty tent for patient treatment.
Many oppose officials nationwide who propose limiting Narcan treatment on patients who overdose multiple times to save city dollars, saying it's their job to save lives, not to play God.
While it's unclear what exact substance they were exposed to while treating a patient for cardiac arrest, two paramedics, an EMT and a fire chief were observed at a hospital after experiencing high blood pressure, rapid heartbeat, and mood changes.
After a forest fire broke out, students, residents and nursing home residents were evacuated and treated for light smoke inhalation before police started allowing people to return to their buildings.