Ivy Tech Community College Awards Joseph E. Rood, Jr. Memorial Scholarship

Ivy Tech Community College Awards Joseph E. Rood, Jr. Memorial Scholarship

Press Release Jan 26, 2012

EVANSVILLE, IN: Ivy Tech Community College - Southwest students Angela Webb and Shannon Nowlan have been awarded the annual Joseph E. Rood, Jr. Memorial Scholarship.

The scholarship, in honor of the late Joseph E. Rood, Jr. is awarded to students enrolled in the Paramedic Science program at Ivy Tech Community College. Each student will receive scholarship support for their spring tuition.

A Navy veteran, Rood worked at Deaconess Hospital for over 28 years, serving as an EMS Coordinator and a Clinical Quality Improvement Analyst. Rood was best known for his pioneering efforts in patient care and paramedic science, and while working at Deaconess Hospital he created a unique curriculum for teaching EMTs.

“Joe came to Evansville in 1978 to help develop the EMS program. By creating this Ivy Tech scholarship in Joe’s name I’m continuing with his goals,” said his wife Gayle Brubeck Rood. “I know that Joe’s passion for caring for others will live on through the students.”

For more information about the Joseph E. Rood, Jr. Memorial Scholarship, and other scholarships available for Ivy Tech Community College students, please contact the Ivy Tech Community College Office of Resource Development at 812/ 429-1408.

About Ivy Tech

Ivy Tech Community College is the state’s largest public post-secondary institution and the nation’s largest single-accredited statewide community college system with more than 200,000 students enrolled annually.  Ivy Tech has campuses throughout Indiana.  It serves as the state's engine of workforce development, offering affordable degree programs and training that are aligned with the needs of its community along with courses and programs that transfer to other colleges and universities in Indiana.  It is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission and a member of the North Central Association.

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