Data Recorder Provides Legal Protection for Agency

OPS

Data Recorder Provides Legal Protection for Agency

Article Jul 10, 2012

In today’s world of what seems like relentless lawsuits being filed, it’s more important than ever that EMS professionals protect themselves in the event their practices come under fire. Drew McKenzie, assistant director of logistics and senior tactical medic at Mobile Life Support Services in New Windsor, NY, says that less expensive products are available, but “you get what you pay for.”

The Digital Ally DVM-250Plus Event Data Recorder, however, is reliable, and provides excellent video and sound, explains McKenzie. He says the product is fairly new to the EMS industry, but has many success stories in law enforcement. Mobile Life Support Services received two camera systems in the spring of this year.

Previously, Mobile Life Support was using a self-contained unit and had several issues with lost or corrupted data. The device also only had forward-facing and cab cameras. With the Digital Ally DVM-250Plus, the group is able to record audio and video inside, as well as video outside the vehicle, and that recording can be set to start automatically or manually.

McKenzie says his group wanted the ability to have the unit go into “low power” when the vehicle’s ignition was turned off, and also have the camera fully operational in seconds after the ignition was turned on. This product does that, and much more.

“Additionally,” he says, “we wanted the ability to record the backup camera when the rear doors were opened in case there was an issue with loading or unloading the stretcher.”

All employees’ wishes were fulfilled with the Digital Ally Event Data Recorder. The SD card can easily be pulled and replaced, and the video reviewed and saved on a computer. The card can also be locked so it is unable to be switched or tampered with, another way to counter accusations if the need arises.

“Since we initiated video recording about a year ago, we have had some incidents where the cameras have provided proof that our staff was compliant with policies and procedures,” says McKenzie.

A Consumer Reports investigation in 2017 revealed 68% of air ambulance crashes were connected to four of the largest air medical companies.
Augusta dispatchers receive so many unnecessary calls that Gold Cross EMS writes off $1 million per year for non-reimbursable calls.
The Virgin Island territory was forced to cancel 30 out of 40 EMT interviews when last year's hurricanes hit, leaving the island with only 44 EMTs.
The ACETECH iN∫COMMAND solution is a touch screen control center designed to give providers full control of the ambulance by managing and monitoring auxiliary controls.
In response to an increase in medical calls, the department purchased the lifting aid to the benefit of providers and patients.
Acadian Ambulance employees were en route to a call when the accident occurred involving another vehicle.
The bill would require Medicaid and other insurance companies to reimburse an agency whether or not a patient needed transport.
San Diego once used a software that filtered out frequent callers, such as drug addicts, the mentally ill, and homeless people, which saved the city money.
The new catalog benefits end users and dealers in reducing downtime and checking product availability.
Rural residents who live hours from the nearest hospitals pay a fee in exchange for air ambulance companies promising no additional out-of-pocket bills after a transport.
A patient repeatedly kicked one Chicago medic in the head while a separate altercation nearby sent a bullet through the ambulance.
Jonathan Dobbs purchased an ambulance for an Alaskan town he'd visited after learning its only ambulance had been vandalized.
The EMS Week gift to the Safe America Foundation will also be used to assist opioid addicts and vets with traumatic stress.
The Canadian specialty vehicle manufacturer will be supplying the Canadian Armed Forces military bases with specialized ambulances.
Citizens Ambulance EMT Shawn Miller was bit in the stomach by a combative patient who was found passed out behind a store.