Leading Edge Show Keeps Jersey Medics Sharp

Leading Edge Show Keeps Jersey Medics Sharp

The New Jersey Association of Paramedic Programs (NJAPP) hosted its 27th annual Leading Edge conference on April 16th at the Stony Hill Inn in Hackensack. Despite the difficult weather and major roadway flooding it brought to the area that morning, course organizers reported the 2018 meeting had one of the best turnouts in Leading Edge’s history, with more than 130 advanced life support (ALS) providers in attendance and vendor support from major EMS equipment, vehicle, and software providers like First Priority, ZOLL, Revenue Guard, and V.E. Ralph.
 
Leading Edge is hosted every year as a forum for state ALS providers to gather with subject-matter experts and review the most recent advances in clinical practice and literature while networking with peers in a uniquely New Jersey location. Past conferences have been held at locations such as the USS New Jersey,  Adventure Aquarium in Camden, and Jersey City’s Liberty Science Center. The conference venue rotates annually throughout the state to offer access to medics, nurses, and speakers from varying geographic areas. In addition to providing “leading edge” education to the state’s prehospital providers at a low cost, the conference also provides support for NJAPP’s legislative and professional initiatives throughout the year, which are designed to safeguard quality care and keep New Jersey’s ALS services capable of meeting today’s healthcare challenges.
 
This year’s speakers included Shaun Patterson, DO, speaking about fundamentals of ECMO therapy; Lisa Drago, DO, speaking about pediatric congenital heart defects; Faizan Arshad, MD, speaking about push-dose medications in the prehospital setting; Mark Merlin, DO, summarizing the year in EMS literature; Jawad Kirmani, MD, speaking about advances in stroke triage and interventional neurovascular care; and attorney Matthew Streger giving a colorful lecture on current legal trends in EMS. Brian Lacroix from Minnesota’s Allina Health EMS provided a keynote address, and Scot Phelps, director of New Jersey’s Office of EMS, provided updates to state protocol and regulatory changes.
 
Preparations are already underway for next year’s Leading Edge conference, which will be held in the central part of the state in spring 2019. Direct questions to info@njmedics.com or visit www.njmedics.com.

Joshua D. Hartman, MBA, NRP, is vice president of the Public Safety Division for HMP, publisher of EMS World. 

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