AHA Provides CPR Demo to Ga. Residents

AHA Provides CPR Demo to Ga. Residents

News Jun 12, 2017

June 10—People in downtown Augusta were reminded Friday how simple it can be to save a life. The American Heart Association, in partnership with Gold Cross Emergency Medical Services, set up mannequins at the association's red table across from the James Brown statue to mark CPR and AED awareness.

Capt. Connie Waldhour of the Gold Cross Emergency Medical Services demonstrated to curious passersby how to correctly perform hands-only CPR.

One-by-one Waldhour instructed participants to place their hands directly in between the center of the mannequins chest and push two inches deep into it.

After a few failed attempts, Delores Wilson—an Augusta resident who said she was drawn to the table by the flailing of Heart Man, the American Heart Association's mascot—finally grasped making complete chest compressions.

"I was attracted by the heart shaped (mascot) and my friend and I came down to take a picture of it and then I noticed that they were doing a demo," she said. "I have a husband who has a heart condition so it interested me very well, and finally I got it."

Her friend Cynthia Millsaps, who has a heart issue, assisted Wilson with her compressions. Millsaps said she feels equipped not only to teach someone about hands-only CPR but to potentially save their life.

"I have a heart condition so it makes me feel good that I actually learned how to do it," she said. "I saw it on TV where they were learning how to do it and he actually asked at the end, 'I can save you, can you save me?' so actually now I can say that I can save somebody else because I actually did it myself."

Catherine Ramsey, the senior communications and marketing director for the American Heart Association, said the mission is to spread the message that it only takes a minute to save someone's life.

According to Ramsey, about 90 percent of people who suffer out-of-hospital cardiac arrest die. A report from the American Heart Association states that CPR, especially if performed immediately, can double or triple a cardiac arrest victim's chance of survival.

"Its just two simple steps—call 9-1-1 and push," Ramsay said.

Continue Reading

Clark Rabun, who served in the Marines, said little has changed since the time he learned CPR, but to see it still being taught is reassuring.

"It used to be mouth and chest pumps and now it's just mostly chest pumps and they say you don't stop until you get an emergency vehicle or somebody to help you, so that is the two changes right there," he said.

"But I actually feel good that I can do that on someone. I hadn't done it in a few years and I just think that it is a very good thing for folks to learn how to do in case they need to do it."

___ (c)2017 The Augusta Chronicle (Augusta, Ga.) Visit The Augusta Chronicle (Augusta, Ga.) at chronicle.augusta.com Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

Source
mcClatchy
Nefeteria Brewster
Dickinson College received a $5,000 grant to teach first responders how to treat traumatic injuries during mass-casualty incidents.
Lexi Sima was 16 when she survived sudden cardiac arrest because of bystanders' CPR and use of an AED, leading her family to advocate for CPR education.
MassBay Community College's nursing, EMT, and paramedic students participated in a mock disaster drill modeled after nursing home fatalities that occurred during Hurricane Irma.
Springfield firefighters are training for intermediate to paramedic-level certificates to improve patient outcomes, learning techniques like the pit crew method.
To better understand and treat the patients they revive with Narcan, firefighter-EMTs received training on opioid abuse and recovery
Womack Army Medical Center's security guards learned how to properly stop the bleeding in life-threatening wounds through the national Stop the Bleed Campaign.
Nova Southeastern University's Master of Science in Disaster and Emergency Management is online, providing flexibility for working students and offering a discount to full-time fire, EMS, and law enforcement personnel.
ZOLL® Medical Corporation is sponsoring four CAPCE-accredited online safety courses to help first responders mitigate the risks associated with operating emergency vehicles.
Pre-registration is now open for the 2018 NVFC Training Summit which will take place June 1-2, 2018, in Concord, NC.
This is the third EMT Training Course that Mohawk Ambulance Service accepted eight students into at no charge.
The Telecommunicator Emergency Response Taskforce trained two dozen 9-1-1 dispatchers in disaster emergency skills.
Missteps can embarrass organizations and destroy careers—what should leaders know?
Harvey County Emergency Manager Gary Denney, who dealt with a mass shooting in 2016, taught other first responders how to prepare an Incident Command System to deal with such incidents.
The Stop the Bleed campaign holds classes across the country teaching people how to pack wounds and use tourniquets on trauma victims at risk of bleeding to death.
Hawkeye Community College demonstrated the roles of various healthcare professionals treating the injured patients, including paramedics, respiratory therapists, nurses, medical lab technicians, and physical therapists.