Congressman, Others Injured in Shooting at Baseball Practice

Congressman, Others Injured in Shooting at Baseball Practice

News Jun 14, 2017

June 14—U.S. House Majority Whip Steve Scalise has reportedly been injured in a shooting in Alexandria, Virginia this morning.

Fox News reported that Scalise, R-Jefferson, was hit in the hip at around 7:30 a.m. Eastern during congressional baseball practice.

Good Morning America reported that the injury isn't thought to be life threatening.

Multiple people were injured, including Scalise, two Capitol Hill police officers and the gunman, CBS News reported, citing a congressional source.

Alexandria police tweeted that the suspect "is in custody and not a threat."

President Donald Trump issued this statement shortly after the shooting:

"The Vice President and I are aware of the shooting incident in Virginia and are monitoring developments closely. We are deeply saddened by this tragedy. Our thoughts and prayers are with the members of Congress, their staffs, Capitol Police, first responders, and all others affected."

The annual Congressional baseball game is scheduled to take place on Thursday.

Scalise, who is the third ranking member in the House, is the highest ranking member of Louisiana's congressional delegation.

Scalise, 51, has served in Congress since 2008, after having served in the state Legislature.

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The Alexandria Police Department is handling the incident, CBS News reported.

___ (c)2017 The Advocate, Baton Rouge, La. Visit The Advocate, Baton Rouge, La. at www.theadvocate.com Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

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